With Shane Warne gone, it is now upto me to pass his teachings to younger players, says Ricky Ponting

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With Shane Warne gone, it is now upto me to pass his teachings to younger players, says Ricky Ponting
With Shane Warne gone, it is now upto me to pass his teachings to younger players, says Ricky Ponting

With Shane Warne gone, it is now upto me to pass his teachings to younger players, says Ricky Ponting

Former Australia captain Ricky Ponting has expressed his condolences on Shane Warne tragic death, saying it is now his duty to pass on the legendary spinner’s lessons to the next generation.

Warne died of a suspected heart attack on Friday at the age of 52.

“He was a teacher through his commentary and I’ve seen hundreds of photos over the last 24 hours of all the spinners he worked with. He helped Steve Smith in his younger days and Rashid Khan has been catching up with him – just imagine the conversations they would have had. So I feel it is now up to me whenever I get an opportunity to just let the world know what he was like and pass on some of the things I learnt from him,” Ponting said on the ‘ICC Review’.

“I woke up nice and early I was getting the kids ready to go to netball and Rianna (Ponting’s wife) looked at her phone and told me the news about Warney. I grabbed the phone out of her hand to look at it and I couldn’t believe it and it is still the same now. It was so raw to me I couldn’t really speak and every time I thought about him and our experiences and our journey together and I just got short for words,” he added.

Ricky Ponting breaks down as he pays tribute to Shane Warne
With Shane Warne gone, it is now upto me to pass his teachings to younger players, says Ricky Ponting.
When asked what would he really want to say to Warne, Ponting said:

“I would say just how much I love him. I didn’t say that to him and I wish I did.”

Ponting also reflected on his memories of Warne, revealing that he was awestruck by some of the leg spinner’s friends and giving tribute to the type of man he was.

“If you spent a day with him it was amazing to see some of the names flashing up on his mobile phone. It was very rare for Warney just to be sitting at home. He would always try and find time for his friends and his family and that was one of his great strengths,” said Ponting.

“The more people talking about Shane, the thing that will shine through will be just how loyal he was to family and friends and how loved he was. He had the energy that drew you to him and that is a trait that not a lot of people have,” he added.

Warne was regarded as one of the greatest cricketers of all time. When he first came to prominence in the early 1990s, he almost single-handedly revolutionised leg-spin bowling, and by the time he retired from international cricket in 2007, he had been the first bowler to reach 700 Test wickets.

Shane was named one of Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack’s Five Cricketers of the Twentieth Century for his contributions to Australia’s ICC Cricket World Cup success in 1999, when he was named player of the match in both the semi-final and final.